Updating an ASP.NET Core Site to the December 2016 Release How to upgrade a site on the LTS 1.0.3 version of ASP.NET Core

I run into an issue this week during what should have been a simple ASP.NET Core application update. I wanted to share my experience in case others run into similar problems. Also, I’m sure to be back here myself to remember this in the future!

On December 13th Microsoft released their second minor patch release for the LTS (Long Term Support) track of .NET Core. ASP.NET Core releases on two tracks depending on how cutting edge you want to be. LTS is the “safer” track, which will be supported and bug fixed during the support lifespan. The other track is FTS (Fast Track Support) which will be where new features appear. You can read more about this on the Microsoft Blog.

As you may be aware from reading my other posts, I’m contributing to an opensource charity project called allReady. We’re currently using the LTS track packages and at the time of writing still targeting the full .NET framework (as opposed to .NET Core). We had applied the last patch release 1.0.1 packages in September without any major problems so I was hoping for the same experience with this patch release.

The details for the release were made available in this Microsoft blog post. If you follow the links to the release notes you will see that the ASP.NET Core updates are considered version 1.0.3. This is where the versioning starts to get a little murky in my opinion. ASP.NET Core itself has a version number (now 1.0.3) which tracks general “releases” of the framework. However, the individual packages that actually make up .NET Core and ASP.NET Core also have version numbers and revisions. Those numbers don’t track with the main release version, so it starts to get a bit confusing. You won’t for example find a package for Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc at version 1.0.3. The latest for that package is 1.0.2.

I’ll now step through how I upgraded our project and then discuss the issue I experienced with the EF commands for entity framework. Before starting to update the project I made sure to install the latest version of the 1.0.3 SDK from the Microsoft website.

Update Package.json

This is where the first pain point came for me. It wasn’t listed specifically in the blogs posts or release notes all of the package which had updated and what the latest package versions were. So my initial solution was to turn to the VS Nuget Package Manager where I was hoping I could simply update all of the Microsoft packages to the latest versions. However, since the package manager lists the latest (non pre-release) versions, it was offering me the FTS 1.1.x versions. So a simple, upgrade all option was out of the question.

Next I went into the project.json manually planning to update each package by hand, allowing autocomplete to give me the latest versions. However autocomplete didn’t always seem to pick up the latest version number for me automatically and I was worried about missing something. So I reverted back to the Nuget Package Manager and went one by one through the Microsoft packages. I used the install dropdown to select the newest LTS version 1.0.x for each one. This was slow and manual but at least meant I knew what options I had and could be explicit in choosing the latest version i wanted.

Here’s a rundown the packages from our project.json that I needed to update and the versions number they are are now on (which should be the latest LTS release). Note that our project.json may well differ for newly generated projects so you may not have all of these packages and you may even have dependencies listed that we do not.

"Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.SqlServer": "1.0.2",
"Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore": "1.0.2",
"Microsoft.ApplicationInsights.AspNetCore": "1.0.2",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc": "1.0.2",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.TagHelpers": "1.0.2",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.Cookies": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.Facebook": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.Google": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.MicrosoftAccount": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.Twitter": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Diagnostics": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Diagnostics.EntityFrameworkCore": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Identity.EntityFrameworkCore": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Server.IISIntegration": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Server.Kestrel": "1.0.2",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.StaticFiles": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Cors": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Abstractions": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.UserSecrets": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Logging": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Console": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection.Abstractions": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Options.ConfigurationExtensions": "1.0.1",
"Microsoft.VisualStudio.Web.BrowserLink.Loader": "14.0.1",
"Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.WebApiCompatShim": "1.0.2",
"Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Debug": "1.0.1",

I also had to update the dependencies for some of these in our test library, so remember to check there too.

To complete the upgrade I also adjusted the SDK version in our solution’s global.json as follows…

"sdk": {
  "version": "1.0.0-preview2-003156",
  "runtime": "clr",
  "architecture": "x86"
},

With the above changes made I was able to build and run our site via Visual Studio. Great!

It wasn’t until a couple of days later when I hit an issue. During an issue I was working on I’d updated our model classes Entity Framework and needed to build my next entity framework migration. I did this by running the usual command…

dotnet ef migrations add AddNotifications

After building the project I was faced with the following error:

Could not load file or assembly 'Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore, Version=1.0.1.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=adb9793829ddae60' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040)

At this stage I tried a few things, none of which fixed the problem outright, although they may have contributed to the overall solution. Firstly I cleaned my solution and rebuilt, no joy. Then I wondered if Nuget had cached any incorrect versions of the package, so I cleared my local Nuget cache and tried restoring my project dependencies again. Still no joy! Finally I hopped onto the ASP.NET Core Slack channel and sought help there. It was with huge thanks to Chad Tolkien then he suggested a manual deletion of my bin and obj folders within the project. I did that and rebuilt the solution. Success! Finally I was able to generate a migration using the EF CLI tooling. So it seems the clean and restore steps previously hadn’t cleaned everything they needed to.

I’d love to know if there’s a better way to manage these updates currently? I’m hoping that with the final tooling release and VS 2017 things will get easier. It would be useful for example, to be able to choose which track you want to use within Nuget Package Manager. I’m not sure how that would be achieved exactly but it would distinguish the packages you really want to get the latest within your chosen support track. It would also be handy if Microsoft blog posts about each release include specific details of each updated package and it’s latest version number. Having a quick reference when updating dependencies would have made my life a little easier. There are some release notes which hint at the main packages and their new version number, but it didn’t include all components that I ended up changing.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *